So you (or your kid) loves anime and wants to be a professional artist. . .

So as I said in this previous post about anime, I am a former kid artist, and I know how it is. You want to draw what you want to draw, not what your teacher or your parents think you should draw. And I’m in total agreement that a kid should draw what they want. Otherwise, art—something they supposedly love—will become a chore, something tedious, and they’ll start to feel resentment. Towards those pressuring them to stop drawing what they want to draw, as well as towards the art itself.

But (there’s always a but!) things change once a kid says they want to go to art school and become a pro. And I don’t care what kind of artist they want to become—illustrator, animator, fine artist—whatever. If they are a big fan of anime and they are talking seriously about a career in art, there are some things that they should realize.

You can’t build a professional career on drawing anime alone (unless you live in Japan!).

There is probably some small, small, infinitesimally small exceptions to this, but that’s the gist of it. Don’t delude yourself otherwise. It’s all fine and good to love anime and love drawing manga and anime art, but once you say that art is what you want to do professionally, you must realize that you’re going to compete with other students who can do all sorts of art, not just anime. Continue reading So you (or your kid) loves anime and wants to be a professional artist. . .

Parents: Your kid and anime

anime

Sailor Moon, a very popular anime character—so well-known that even I have heard of her!

Your kid and anime:

Oy! Since I first started this site (TEN YEARS AGO as I write this) the anime thing has really taken off. And I’ve heard all sorts of pros and cons about kids wanting to draw anime. So here I weigh in with my opinion, and it’s actually very simple and uncomplicated (but with some caveats). Continue reading Parents: Your kid and anime

Ethnic woman, front view

I started drawing an eye, and then filled in the rest of the face from there. I really don’t recommend drawing portraits this way, since so often something gets crooked or wonky. This woman is drawn from my imagination and looks kind of sad. (Hmmm . . . is the drawing “sad,” as in, not very well done? Or do I mean that her expression is sad? Well, maybe both!)

Pencil, approximately 5×5 inches.